Welcome to the Airlines Association of Southern Africa (AASA)

The Airlines Association of Southern Africa (AASA) is the leading representative airline organisation within southern Africa, working together with leaders of the aviation industry and senior public and government officials on policy, regulatory, planning, operational, safety, security and financial matters affecting the overall profitability of the airlines and their continued sustainability.

AASA was formed to represent the mutual interests of its members. Membership is open to all airlines based in southern Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. There are currently 18 Airline Members from this region. In addition, Associate Membership is open to airline partner organisations. There are currently 30 Associate Members, including Airports Company South Africa (ACSA), and airports, both provincial and private airports, the Air Traffic & Navigation Services (ATNS), the South African Weather Service, several oil companies, major aircraft manufacturers, engine manufacturers, a ground handling company, IT service providers, tourism organisations and other industry associations and partners.

AASA leads and coordinates the airline industry position on airport, airspace and civil aviation issues, as well as consumer legislation, environmental and tourism matters, and provides media response to important industry issues.

AASA also leads and coordinates the airline industry position on airport, airspace and civil aviation issues, as well as consumer legislation, environmental and tourism matters, and provides media response to important industry issues. In undertaking this mandate, AASA represents the airline industry on approximately 15 Standing Committees and Boards involving both public and private stakeholders.  






Transformation in SA aviation industry hindered by skills shortage
October 13, 2017. 
AASA news.
 

Building Human Capital for African Airlines was the theme at this year's 47th Annual General Assembly, and the challenges such as skills development, training, transformation, the economy, environmental impact and other topical issues affecting airlines and air travel in the SADC region dominated the addresses, debates and panel discussions. 

"Transformation in the aviation industry is non-negotiable and AASA would like to see its pace increased. A challenge AASA has identified is the scarcity of funding – including at university level – and the absence of a specialist aerospace and air transport education institution in Africa," warned AASA's CEO Chris Zweigenthal. Read more...

The intra-Africa connectivity debate
December 11, 2017. 
AASA Africa news.

AASA addresses the intra-Africa connectivity and Single African Air Transport Markets (SAATM) debate, and presents a variety of views and articles, to encourage debate, including: an article by Rwanda's New Times urging the African continent to sign-up to the SAATM initiative to stimulate Africa's economy; a Q&A with Alexandre de Juniac IATA's Director General and CEO around the question: What is wrong with African airlines and why can’t the majority of them break even, much less make a profit?IATA's outlook for Africa in 2018;  and a thought-provoking article by Richard Li of the NTU-SBF Centre for African Studies, presenting his case for the aviation industry being a catalyst for growth in Africa. Read more...

December/Year-End 2017 Economic performance of the airline industry
IATA news.

This semi-annual report takes a broad look at how the airline industry is adding value for its consumers, the wider economy and governments, as well as for its investors. Read more...

November 2017 State of the Region: Africa & Middle East
Business confidence in South Africa recovered a little ground this month, but remains at a level associated with economic slowdown. Sentiment in the Middle East was broadly unchanged this month. Read more...

October 2017 IATA Air Passenger Market Analysis
Air passenger volumes post robust year-on-year growth in October.  Once again, the industry-wide load factor posted a record high for the month (80.8% of available seat kilometres). Read more...

Electric passenger planes to be developed by Airbus, Rolls-Royce and Siemens 
November 28, 2017.
 
Airbus news.

Airbus, Rolls-Royce, and Siemens have teamed up to develop a passenger plane powered by a hybrid-electric motor.

The three companies together announced the groundbreaking collaboration, bringing together some of the world’s foremost experts in electrical and propulsion technologies, at the Royal Aeronautical Society in London.

The E-Fan X hybrid-electric technology demonstrator is anticipated to fly in 2020 following a comprehensive ground test campaign, provisionally on a BAe 146 flying testbed, with one of the aircraft’s four gas turbine engines replaced by a two megawatt electric motor. Read the original article here...


Intra-Africa business travel heats up as visa regimes fall
November 27, 2017.
Big Ambitions news. 

From December 1, South African and Angolan citizens will be able to visit each other's countries without having to obtain a visa. 

The news comes off the back of an announcement by Namibia that it would scrap visas for African citizens.

The free movement of people is the cornerstone of regional integration, according to the African Development Bank. 

"When business people can travel more easily across the continent because of liberal visa policies, they bring higher levels of investment, fresh skills and expand the range of goods and services on offer," says Oz Desai, Corporate Traveller South Africa General Manager. Read the original article here...

SADC Travels   |   Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park


Image credit:  By Maryam Laura Moazedi (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons


Above:  Map of the Greater Limpopo Frontier Park. Image credit: By Aymatth2 (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons


If you are planning a safari trip to Southern Africa be sure to consider the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park for a life-changing visit. The park straddles the borders of Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe and joins some of the most established wildlife areas in southern Africa into a huge conservation area of 37 572km² (± the size of the Netherlands). This forms the core of the second-phase transfrontier conservation area (TFCA), measuring almost 100 000km² - the world's greatest animal kingdom. The larger transfrontier conservation area  includes Banhine and Zinave national parks, the Massingir and Corumana areas and interlinking regions in Mozambique, as well as private and state-owned conservation areas in South Africa and Zimbabwe bordering on the transfrontier park.

Visit the website for more information.

Limpopo National Park: where to stay

Machampane Luxury Tented Camp Situated in the solitude of a pristine wilderness area in the Lebombo Mountains. Accommodation consists of luxury en-suite tents on raised decks, set into the river bank and overlooking the Machampane River. 

Visit the website for more information.

Sources: wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Limpopo_Transfrontier_Park & 
peaceparks.co.za/Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park Attractions & greatlimpopo.org

Environment News    |   Solar Impulse 2: first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the world


Above: Solar Impulse 2, piloted by Bertrand Piccard, taking off from Payerne Air Base on 13 November 2014. Image source & credit: By Milko Vuille (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Solar Impulse is a Swiss long-range experimental solar-powered aircraft project, and also the name of the project's two operational aircraft. The privately financed project is led by Swiss engineer and businessman André Borschberg and Swiss psychiatrist and balloonist Bertrand Piccard, who co-piloted Breitling Orbiter 3, the first balloon to circle the world non-stop. The Solar Impulse project's goals were to make the first circumnavigation of the Earth by a piloted fixed-wing aircraft using only solar power and to bring attention to clean technologies. Read more about this historic flight around the world...

Visit the Solar Impulse Foundation website for more information.

Sources: wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_Impulse & solarimpulse.com & bbc.com/news/science-environment-36890563

When I was flying around the world in my solar airplane, I remember looking at the sun that was giving energy to my four electric motors and their huge propellers. There was no noise, no pollution, no fuel... and I could fly forever. At a certain moment I thought ‘this is science fiction, I’m in the future.’ And then I realized, ‘no, it’s wrong, I’m in the present; this is what the technologies of today already allow me to do. It’s the rest of the world that is in the past, with old and inefficient devices’. Bertrand Piccard, Solar Impulse